Ask an Atheist with Sam Mulvey

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Interview with Valerie Tarico

Join Becky and Deanna in the studio as they speak with Valerie Tarico about universal morality, and continuing the conversation about reproductive rights.

Valerie Tarico is a psychologist and former director of the Children’s Behavior and Learning Clinic in Bellevue, Washington.  Her articles can be found regularly in the Green and Religion sections of the Huffington Post. She is the founder ofwww.WisdomCommons.org, an interactive library of quotes, stories, proverbs and poems that showcase humanity’s shared moral core.

Tarico’s first book, Deas and Other Imaginings, is a collection of stories described as “somewhere between Zen and folktales, somewhere between child’s play and wisdom, somewhere between dreaming the world and healing it.”

In her own effort to heal a world that is being fractured by cultural and religious zealots, Tarico wrote a second book, Trusting Doubt (former title, The Dark Side), about her personal encounter with religious fundamentalism and her spiritual journey in search of love and truth.

She has developed a series of lectures informed by her clinical practice and personal experiences that equips parents and educators with tools to understand and nurture the innate character virtues and moral instincts in children.

 

About the Author: Sam Mulvey

Sam Mulvey is a producer and the technical brain behind Ask an Atheist. He is a collector of vinegar varieties, vintage computers, antique radios, and propaganda.

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4 Comments on "Interview with Valerie Tarico"

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Joseph
Guest

Wait, you guys are getting hit by some idiot fundie hacker, and they haven’t attacked the ACA resources yet?

Mike Gillis
Guest

There’s no evidence that the hacking was aimed at us, or perpetrated by a fundie.

According to Sam, it was aimed at the company we register our URL with, so we got hit by something much larger. It’s quite possible that it was aimed at us, but I’m afraid we’d be flattering ourselves if we claimed credit for motivating this.

Hellbound Alleee
Guest

I think the important thing to point out about the “emo” thing in the middle east is that this is yet another attack on gays. The Emo style of dress is considered gay, which is, of course, Satanic. Anything not of the religion is considered “satanic,” including atheism.

And that’s where you guys got it spot on when you mentioned the Satanic Panic in the 90’s. The Fundies assured us that anything not Christian is indeed Satanic.

James
Guest

You said you will answer questions about morality? How is that possible since we would not have morals outside of a universe made by God?

Men make laws, not morality.

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